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eBook Expo

Displays featuring eBooks from UNO Libraries.

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The stories of kings and queens have long fascinated scholars and laypersons alike, given that much of world history was swayed by the decisions of a privileged few in many parts of the world. Though court intrigue and drama often unfolded behind gold-lined doors in old days, literature and entertainment like Game of Thrones have made stories about European noble life into a pop culture staple. Not so apparent in some of this entertainment are the harsh realities of monarchy and imperialism, which led to the colonization and, often, systematic eradication of cultures in the name of royalty. This has brought about questions of monarchy in our modern age, especially those that despite odds, have endured, like the British monarchy (which was one inspiration for the Game of Thrones book series!).

The British monarchy is far from the only one to have existed in history, but the throne's reach across time, borders, and oceans has intrigued many for centuries. This display uses the British monarchy as a real-world example of the sociopolitical complexities dramatized in media like Game of Thrones. Who will succeed Queen Elizabeth II? If the British monarchy is eventually abolished, what ramifications would this have for the few remaining royal families of the world? Is the concept of "royalty" nothing more than a ceremonial, outdated tradition? What, if any, is the responsibility of current royal dynasts to the descendants of suppressed ancestry? These reads will guide you to interesting places on these questions.

In this display:

  • Alexander, M. (2011). Britain's royal heritage: An a to z of the monarchy. The History Press.
  • Arbiter, V. (2016). Queen elizabeth ii: Pocket giants. The History Press.
  • Barton, G. A. (2014). Informal empire and the rise of one world culture. Palgrave Macmillan, Ltd.
  • Black, J. (2006). George iii: America’s Last King. Yale University Press.
  • Bullen, A. (2013). The little book of the tudors. The History Press.
  • Glencross, M., Rowbotham, J., & Kandiah, M. D. (Eds.). (2016). The windsor dynasty 1910 to the present: 'long to reign over us'?. Palgrave Macmillan, Ltd.
  • Gristwood, S. (2013). Blood sisters: The women behind the wars of the roses. Basic Books.
  • Horning, N. (2019). The british monarchy: The changing role of the royal family. Greenhaven Publishing.
  • Kinane, K., & Pagès, M. (2015). The middle ages on television: Critical essays. McFarland.
  • Lloyd-Jones, N., & Scull, M. M. (Eds.). (2017). Four nations approaches to modern 'british' history: A (dis)united kingdom?. Palgrave Macmillan, Ltd.
  • Martín Párraga, J., & Torralbo Caballero, J. de D. (2016). New medievalisms. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
  • The New York Times Editorial Staff. (Ed.). (2018). Royal couples: Harry and meghan markle, william and kate middleton, and charles and diana. Rosen Publishing Group.
  • Tharoor, S. (2018). Inglorious empire: What the british did to india. Scribe Publications.
  • Walter, D. (2017). Colonial violence: European empires and the use of force. Oxford University Press, Inc.
  • Weinczok, D. C. (2019). The history behind game of thrones: The north remembers. Pen & Sword Books, Ltd.